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BorneoPost (Borneo) 09/27/2020 13:10
Sixteen workers died and one is in a critical condition after being trapped underground in a coal mine in southwest China on Sunday, reported state broadcaster CCTV. A conveyor belt caught fire in the early hours of the morning, state news agency Xinhua cited the government as saying, which produced dangerous levels of carbon monoxide. [...]. .
Guardian (United Kingdom) 09/27/2020 13:09
21 containers violated international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material. Sri Lanka has shipped back to Britain container-loads of waste that the government said were brought into the island in violation of international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material. The 21 containers – holding up to 260 tonnes of rubbish – first arrived by ship in the capital Colombo’s main port between September 2017 and March 2018, customs told AFP, adding that they departed Sri Lanka on Saturday.
AlterNet - Environment blog 09/27/2020 13:08
,. Michael Cohen, in his recent has called President Trump a . The Trump administration's response to this book simply reverses the accusation, calling Cohen someone . Nonetheless, the media has often noted the frequency with which President Trump lies. The Washington Post, for instance, maintains a running database of what it terms the President's “" – which now number over 20,000, or an average of 12 per day. Media's accounts of Trump's lies would seem to indicate that most people are wholeheartedly opposed to lying – and, in particular, opposed to being lied to by presidents. And yet a recent found that all American presidents – from Washington to Trump – have told lies, knowingly, in their public statements. As a , with a focus on how pe.
Equities.com 09/27/2020 13:07
Image: Dr. Dieter Zetsche. Source: Daimer. FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Investors welcomed former Daimler chief executive Dieter Zetsche's decision to forego his role as chairman of the German carmaker, announced at the weekend and starting a race to find an independent head of the company's supervisory board. Zetsche, 67, a former head of the Mercedes-Benz brand, was due to take a seat as chairman of the board of directors at the Stuttgart-based company after a two-year cooling off period. In a surprise move, he announced in an interview in Sunday newspaper the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung that he would renounce his position, breaking a decades-old practice among German companies of promoting executives to board directors. Now Manfred Bi.

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