Millie
your market intelligence analyst
Search Results
Edit Save
47 results
Functional neurological disorder (FND), also known as conversion disorder, is receiving renewed attention now that certain physical signs have been validated as being specific for the diagnosis. The improved diagnostic specificity has encouraged clinician-scientists to study the neurobiology of FND with the hope of developing better treatments.
The beta-amyloid hypothesis has dominated Alzheimer's disease research for nearly 35 years. It proposes that plaques, comprised of the protein beta-amyloid, destroy synapses and stimulate the development of neurofibrillary tangles of the tau protein, which kills neurons in patients with the disease. Resultantly, neuroinflammation is triggered, which destroys more neurons and ultimately leads to dementia.
The woman’s genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer’s by the time she turned 50. She, , going back generations, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.
Hospitalization is a. choice. That may sound surprising coming from a health care provider, but the fact is that hospitalization is not a necessity, especially for end-of-life patients with cognitive impairment. A trip to the hospital can be stressful — and downright torturous — for someone with Alzheimer's disease or another form of dementia — and almost as bad for the caregiver who accompanies them.
Due to concerns surrounding COVID-19, we are taking every precaution to protect our research participants, study partners, and staff. We have shut down our in-house research operations, including clinical trials. Our staff are working remotely from their homes and participants and study partners are not coming in for visits. For some studies, we are continuing to perform remote visits that consist of either phone calls with our staff or computerized tests that can be done from home.
The brain’s neural activity — long implicated in disorders ranging from dementia to epilepsy — also plays a role in human aging and life span, according to research led by scientists in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School (HMS). The study, published today in , is based on findings from human brains, mice, and worms and suggests that excessive activity in the brain is linked to shorter life spans, while suppressing such overactivity extends life.
As a lifelong Alzheimer’s researcher, Dorene Rentz sees many brain scans with amyloid plaques, a telltale sign of the disease that ravages the brains and memories of its victims. But there’s one scan she’s unable to see: that of her husband, Ray Berggren. Never did she think that one day her 73-year-old husband would be part of a clinical trial she helped design, whose overall cognitive outcomes she will eventually help analyze.
Arthur Kleinman, MD, is the author of . He is one of the most renowned and influential scholars and writers on psychiatry, anthropology, global health, and cultural issues in medicine. Educated at Stanford University and Stanford Medical School, he has taught at Harvard for over forty years.
In the fall of 2011, one month shy of his 59th birthday, Steve Johanson was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Faced with “his worst nightmare,” Steve, a construction project manager from Watertown, Massachusetts, and his wife Judy, a family daycare provider, decided to face the disease together. For the next six years, the couple sought advice from doctors, visited museums, took gardening classes and surrounded themselves with family. But by the spring of 2017, things had started to unravel.
Alzheimer’s disease can be a long haul, with some symptoms taking years and even decades to progress. By the time a patient is in end stage Alzheimer’s, however, the signs are clear. They’ve progressed to severe dementia, and will likely need around-the-clock care for physical and mental needs.
Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) is a complex, challenging brain disorder that affects many parts of the brain. Although less known than its “cousins” Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, it affects 1.4 million Americans. Where Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, it is followed by LBD and then Parkinson’s. Henry Paulson, M.D., Ph. D., University of Michigan, says: “Despite the prevalence of Lewy Body Dementia, confirming it can be challenging for doctors and patients alike.”
A few years ago, John Searle thought his life as he knew it was over. His body had slowly stopped working. He had trouble walking, he was falling down, he had bad short-term memory and, at 69, he was incontinent. It was a pattern of decline the retired Canadian engineer from Brantford, Ontario was all too familiar with. His own sister had died of Alzheimer's in her 50s. His father had died of dementia in his early 80s. So he began to start planning for a future he would not be able to participate in.

Food and Human Nutrition

Business Issues

Companies - Public

Companies - Venture Funded

Commodity Prices

Financial Results

Global Markets

Global Risk Factors

Government Agencies

Information Technologies

Legal and Regulatory

Products - Animal

Products - Plant

Political Entities

Strategic Scenarios

Sources

Trends

Hints:

On this page, you see the results of the search you have run.  You may also view the following:

  •  Click on this drop-down menu on the right hand side of the page, to choose between the machine learning-produced Insights Reports, or the listing of concepts extracted from the results, in chart or list format. 


  •  View the number of search results returned for the search in each of your collections, and click on any of those numbers to view the entire listing of results from the chosen collection.

  •  Use the search adjustment drop-downs to change the scope, sorting, and presentation of your results.

  •  Show or hide the record’s caption (content description).

  •  Show actions that can be made with the search result record.

  •  Click on the Save button after running your search, to save it so that its results will be updated each time relevant new content is added to the designated collection. You may choose to be notified via search alerts.

Click here for more info on Search Results

Click here for more info on Machine Learning applications