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Demonstrators in Hong Kong are using a number of methods to evade surveillance tracking during recent protests, The Washington Post reports. Protestors have deleted their Chinese phone apps and are using secure digital messaging apps, like Telegram , to plan meetups. They have also gone analog by using cash to pay for purchases, buying single-ride subway tickets instead of prepaid stored-value cards and buying pay-as-you-go SIM cards. Protestors are wearing masks to protect their identity from CCTV, and unlike in past civil disobedience movements, images from demonstrations are not being posted to social media. The identity-masking efforts are being used as protestors fear the lines have blurred between the Hong Kong police and China, which.
In this week's Privacy Tracker global legislative roundup, take a look at a new IAPP white paper that helps privacy professionals as they work to operationalize their California Consumer Privacy Act compliance programs. A piece for The Privacy Advisor looks at the potential future of the ePrivacy Regulation as Finland is set to start its six-month EU presidency. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada announced it has revised the framework for its transborder data flow consultation, and the Spanish Data Protection Agency, the AEPD, fined soccer league La Liga 250,000 euros for alleged violations of the EU General Data Protection Regulation. (IAPP member login required.) Full Story.
Israeli forensics firm and law enforcement Cellebrite announced a tool that law enforcement can use to unlock iOS and Android devices, Wired reports. The tool, referred to as the Universal Forensic Extraction Device, can reportedly be used to unlock any iOS, beginning with iOS 7 through the latest update, without user consent. While there are companies that access personal devices for law enforcement, this is the first time a security firm has publicly acknowledged this ability. Meanwhile, TechCrunch reports 7 million Venmo transactions have been data scraped over a six-month period. This comes just one year after a similar incident in which hundreds of millions of Venmo transactions were downloaded. (Registration may be required to access
In an op-ed for The New York Times’ Privacy Project, Yale Law School Information Society Project Visiting Fellow Michael Kwet writes about the various ways retail stores are tracking shoppers' physical movements via Bluetooth beacons. While this information helps companies target advertising to individual shoppers, “the process of 'informed consent' fails to protect user privacy” as shoppers have to know the beacons exist in the first place in order to provide informed consent. “Most of our concerns about privacy are tied to the online world, and can feel theoretical at times,” he writes. “But there is nothing theoretical about Bluetooth beacon technology that follows you into retail stores (and other venues) and tracks your movement down t.
Foley Hoag Security, Privacy and the Law Blog looks at the key provisions within the New York Privacy Act . The NYPA would apply to “legal entities that conduct business in New York” and go into effect within 180 days after it is enacted. Organizations face fiduciary duties if they collect, sell or license any personal data. The bill is currently under consideration by the state Senate’s Consumer Protection Committee. Meanwhile, Gov. Larry Hogan, R-Md., signed a bill to amend Maryland’s data breach notification law, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., introduced a bill to create protections for genetic, biometric and personal health information. Full Story.
Privacy engineering is the evolving practice of incorporating data privacy into product and service development and building data governance controls into systems that process personal information. In response to this emerging trend, the IAPP has created a new web conference series to highlight workable solutions and innovative people and ideas. Join the IAPP July 9 for the second installment of Privacy Engineering Live in which Fieldfisher Privacy and Security Information Partner Phil Lee, CIPP/E, CIPM, FIP, Enterprivacy Consulting Group Principal Consultant R. Jason Cronk, CIPP/US, CIPM, CIPT, FIP, and VeraSafe Privacy Counsel Josh Gresham, CIPP/E, discuss a question privacy professionals agree to disagree on: Is encrypted data considered.
In this week's Privacy Tracker global legislative roundup, take a look at a new IAPP white paper that helps privacy professionals as they work to operationalize their California Consumer Privacy Act compliance programs. A piece for The Privacy Advisor looks at the potential future of the ePrivacy Regulation as Finland is set to start its six-month EU presidency. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada announced it has revised the framework for its transborder data flow consultation, and the Spanish Data Protection Agency, the AEPD, fined soccer league La Liga 250,000 euros for alleged violations of the EU General Data Protection Regulation. LATEST NEWS. The European Union Aviation Safety Agency published a new set of rules on the us.
U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., has sent a letter to 13 car manufacturers calling for more transparency regarding the collection of driver data. Merkley is seeking clarity on whether or not the companies are collecting data, and if so, he wants to know details on the type of data, ownership and storage. "While data plays an integral role in advancing new technology to maximize consumer benefits and bolster the American automotive industry, it is necessary to understand the scope, purpose, and extent to which our cars collect data," Merkley wrote. "It is understandable that this data is used to improve performance and safety, though it may be unclear to many consumers what level of ownership they have over the data collected by the car they
CNET reports the U.S. Government Accountability Office has released a report citing four government entities that are vulnerable to data breaches and fraud due to a shared security measure. The U.S. Postal Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Social Security Administration, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services each use Knowledge-Based Verification, which calls for applicants to verify identity using personal information, such as birthdates, social security numbers and addresses. This form of verification was compromised due to data breaches like the 2017 Equifax breach that exposed the Knowledge-Based Verification information of 145.5 million Americans. U.S. Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., along with Re.
Public interest groups have filed a complaint to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission alleging that wireless carriers broke privacy laws while sharing customer location data without consent, The Hill reports. Wireless providers AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile told the FCC last month that they had ended their third-party sharing . “The wireless carriers have been engaging in serious violations of their customers’ privacy. But the law is clear on this issue: wireless carriers need consent from their customers before they can disclose customer location data to third parties,” New America’s Open Technology Institute Senior Counsel Eric Null said in a statement. “The carriers’ practices have been public for over a year now, and the FCC
The Hill reports more than 20 U.S. House Democrats signed a letter to the Department of Homeland Security pressing for answers regarding the use of facial-recognition software by Customs and Border Protection in airports. The group of Democrats, which is headed by Reps. Susan Wild, D-Pa., Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., and Yvette Clarke, D-N.Y., is concerned with CBP's rapid expansion of facial recognition in U.S. airports and scans involving U.S. citizens. "This is an unprecedented and unauthorized expansion of the agency’s authority," lawmakers wrote in the letter. "As such, we urge the agency to allow for public input and establish privacy safeguards." The Hill also reports that CBP has identified 141 cases of unknown identity after facial-reco.
Happy Flag Day from Portsmouth, New Hampshire! We've spent a lot of time in recent months discussing state and federal privacy law in this country ... and with good reason! There's a lot going on and a ton to keep up with, but I want to focus today on a few developments this week involving transborder data flows. As a side note, it's hard to believe it was less than three years ago that we were collectively focused on the fate of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield agreement. Post-Obama presidency, the GDPR and CCPA, it seems like a distant memory. Earlier today, the Federal Trade Commission today announced it is taking action against several companies that falsely claimed compliance with Shield and other international privacy agreements. Specifical.
We know, there's lots of privacy news, guidance and documentation to keep up with every day. And we also know, you're busy doing all the things required of the modern privacy professional. Sure, we distill the latest news and relevant content down in the Daily Dashboard and our weekly regional digests, but sometimes that's even too much. To help, we offer our top-five most-read stories of the week. Full Story.
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced it has reached a settlement with background-screening company SecurTest over allegations it falsely claimed to have participated in both the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield and Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield agreements. The FTC’s complaint states SecurTest said on its website it participated in both agreements; however, the company never completed the process to be certified under the frameworks. SecurTest is prohibited from misrepresenting its participation in any government-sponsored privacy and security program as part of the settlement. The FTC also sent 13 companies warning letters over false claims of participation in the U.S-EU and U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor frameworks. Full Story.
Encrypted messaging app Telegram said it was the target of a cyberattack originating from China, The Hill reports. The attack occurred at the same time protests were taking place in Hong Kong over a bill that would extradite people to mainland China. Telegram Founder and CEO Pavel Durov said that every major distributed-denial-of-service attack it has experienced “coincided in time with protests in Hong Kong.” While service was disrupted, Durov said Telegram’s encryption was not affected during the attack. The Chinese government has denied it was behind the attack. Full Story.
The U.S. House of Representatives passed an amendment to a proposed appropriations bill that would lift a 20-year ban on funding for a unique, national patient identifier, GovInfoSecurity reports. The House and Senate still need to approve the appropriations bill, while the Senate has to approve a similar provision, and the final bill must contain the amendment before it can be signed off by President Donald Trump. The creation of a national patient identifier system was initially a requirement of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act when it was passed in 1996. Congress banned the allocation of funds to develop the system in 1999, citing privacy concerns. Proponents of the amendment believe a national identifier would pre.
The New York Times reports Stanford University computer scientists are warning about the consequences of a race to control what they believe will be the next key consumer technology market: virtual assistants. The group received a $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to create a virtual assistant that allows users to avoid giving personal information while maintaining some independence from technology companies. Computer Systems Designer Monica Lam says the group is concerned virtual assistants, such as Alexa and Siri, in their current designs, could have more of an impact on data information than today’s websites and apps. “A monopoly assistant platform has access to data in all our different accounts. They will have more

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