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Brent crude oil prices and the index of the value of the U.S. dollar have generally been moving in opposite directions on a daily basis during the past several months. The two measures are responding to similar economic information—in this case, the outlook for global economic growth and demand expectations. Much of the decline in the U.S. dollar index can be attributed to appreciation in the euro against the U.S. dollar.
The sharp decline in petroleum demand caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and efforts to contain it has led to a similarly significant decline in the supply of petroleum in the second quarter 2020 and, by extension, crude oil production, both internationally and domestically.
Natural gas-fired generation in the Lower 48 states increased nearly 55,000 gigawatthours (GWh), or 9%, in the first half of 2020 compared with the first half of 2019. Natural gas was the fastest-growing source of electric power generation, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Hourly Electric Grid Monitor. The increase in natural gas-fired generation was the result of recent low prices and natural gas-fired power capacity additions, despite a 5% decline in total electricity generation. The decrease in electricity consumption resulted from reduced business activity as a result of COVID-19 mitigation efforts. Natural gas-fired generation from electric power plants reached record-high levels on July 28 as s.
After establishing a record high of 8.0 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in January 2020, U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) fell to an average of 3.1 Bcf/d in July 2020. July exports were similar to LNG exports in May 2018, when the available liquefaction capacity was about one-third of the current capacity. During the week of July 12–18, 2020, LNG weekly exports were loaded by only four vessels for a total of 2.0 Bcf/d—the same levels as the second week of December 2016. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects U.S. LNG exports to remain at low levels for the next few months. According to trade press reports, 45 cargoes have been canceled for August shipments and an estimated 30 cargoes have been canceled for Se.
Efforts to contain the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have dramatically changed global commercial passenger flight volumes. These flights averaged a little more than 70,000 flights per day in January and February, fell to an average of less than 25,000 flights per day in April, and then started to increase again in May. Commercial jet fuel consumption showed a similar pattern, falling from an average of 4.3 million barrels per day (b/d) in January and February to 1.0 million b/d in April.
U.S. gasoline and diesel crack spreads diverged sharply in March and April as a result of the mitigation efforts aimed at slowing the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but they have moved closer since May. Crack spreads are the difference between the price of crude oil and the wholesale price of a refined petroleum product, and they are used by industry to estimate refining margins.
The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) data show that demand (tracked by EIA as product supplied) for gasoline increased month-over-month in May as many states began to relax stay-at-home orders, while demand for jet fuel continued to decline to historic lows because of reduced commercial air travel.
According to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), 121 U.S. coal-fired power plants were repurposed to burn other types of fuels between 2011 and 2019, 103 of which were converted to or replaced by natural gas-fired plants. At the end of 2010, 316.8 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired capacity existed in the United States, but by the end of 2019, 49.2 GW of that amount was retired, 14.3 GW had the boiler converted to burn natural gas, and 15.3 GW was replaced with natural gas combined cycle. The decision for plants to switch from coal to natural gas was driven by stricter emission standards, low natural gas prices, and more efficient new natural gas turbine technology.
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) State Energy Data System (SEDS), Illinois had the highest energy consumption in the Midwest and was the third-highest energy producer of any state in the region. In 2018, customers in Illinois consumed 4.0 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy, and 2.6 quadrillion Btu was produced in the state. Total energy production and consumption in Illinois each accounted for nearly 17% of the Midwest's total.
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System, 2,022 natural gas delivery companies delivered natural gas to end-use customers in the United States in 2018. A delivery company is defined as any entity that delivers natural gas directly to end users. In 2018, local distribution companies (LDCs) primarily served homes and businesses, delivering approximately 90%, or 22 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d), of end-use natural gas to the residential and commercial sectors. Pipeline companies deliver the highest volume of natural gas to end-use consumers in the United States, predominately to electric power and industrial customers. Natural gas distributers operated by municipalities, re.
Utility-scale geothermal power plants in the United States use either steam power or a binary cycle to generate electricity. Of the 2,558 megawatts (MW) of geothermal power plant capacity currently operating in the United States, 1,826 MW of capacity is from steam-powered plants and 731 MW of capacity is from binary-cycle powered plants. Unlike steam-powered geothermal power plants, which use steam directly from a geothermal well to spin a turbine and generate electricity, binary-cycle geothermal power plants use a heat exchanger to take heat from the hot water to heat a secondary fluid that then spins a turbine.
Efforts to contain the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have dramatically reshaped markets for key petroleum fuels, and consumption patterns for jet fuel have seen some of the largest changes. According to the International Energy Agency, global jet fuel demand averaged 8.0 million barrels per day (b/d) in 2019, which is less than both gasoil/diesel demand (28.9 million b/d) and gasoline demand (26.4 million b/d). But, air travel-and by extension jet fuel demand-has proved particularly vulnerable to the disruptions caused by COVID-19 mitigation efforts. As of July 29, 2020, of the 37 member states of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), 32 are partially or completely closed to international air travel a.
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) most recent Monthly Energy Review, the United States consumed 6.5 quadrillion British thermal units of energy in April 2020, the lowest monthly energy consumption since September 1989. Energy consumption in April 2020 was 14% lower than in April 2019, the largest year-over-year decrease in EIA's monthly total energy consumption, a data series that dates back to 1973.
According to publicly filed financial statements, 40 U.S. oil producers collectively wrote down $48 billion worth of assets in the first quarter of 2020, the largest quarterly adjustment since at least 2015. Low crude oil prices contributed to significant declines in revenue and the value of these companies' proved reserves. Write-downs reflect negative adjustments in asset values, for example, when a producer acknowledges the value of an oil property has declined to less than the cost of developing it and the company updates its estimate of the oil's value.
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released new biodiesel estimates in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), EIA's comprehensive source for annual state energy statistics. Previously, EIA published national-level biodiesel data as well as state- and plant-level biodiesel plant production capacity. New SEDS estimates include annual biodiesel production and consumption data by state for 2001 through 2018.
The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) latest State Energy Data System (SEDS) update shows Colorado ranked seventh in energy production within a state in 2018. Since 2010, the growth in Colorado's energy production has come primarily from increased fossil fuel production, particularly natural gas and crude oil. Electricity generation from renewable sources has also grown, and coal production has declined.
In 2019, U.S. utility-scale generation facilities consumed 38 quadrillion British thermal units (quads) of energy to provide 14 quads of electricity. Most of the difference between these values was lost as an inherent result of the energy conversion process. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) U.S. electricity flow diagram visualizes U.S. electricity flow from energy sources consumed to generate electricity and electricity net imports to disposition (conversion and other losses, plant use, and end-use consumption).
Consumption of U.S. liquid fuels fell in March and April 2020 as a result of reduced travel related to COVID-19 and its mitigation measures. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) July Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) forecasts that U.S. consumption of total petroleum and other liquid fuels will continue increasing in the second half of 2020 as economic activity increases, but levels will remain lower than the 2019 average until August 2021.

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