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Scientists at MIT and MGH have gained new clues into the role of the brain’s blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent research has found that damage from Alzheimer’s allows toxins to enter the brain, further harming neurons. The results are being used to try and develop new drugs to solidify the blood-brain barrier.
IKEA has been exploring new ways to offer more space for lower prices with . However, the Swedish furniture giant is going one step further and is collaborating with sustainable housing BoKlok and the Queen of Sweden on a project called SilviaBo, according to .
P. rotein aggregation — in which misfolded proteins clump together to form large fibrils — has been implicated in many diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and type II diabetes. While the exact role these fibrils play in diseases isn’t fully understood, many of the current treatments for diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s target the aggregation process. However, finding the right treatment protocols for these drugs, which can be toxic in large doses, is challenging.
David Nisbet’s father died of dementia this summer, and he wanted to do something to honor his dad and also help other families cope with the sadness of watching a loved one’s memory slip away. Nisbet, 58, who helped care for his father, Dinsmore Nisbet, knew how challenging it can be to take a person with dementia out in public, especially for a meal.
An Oregon researcher is shaking up the way we think about clinical studies and long-term research on Alzheimer’s disease. Wearable and sensory technology called Life Lab systems are tracking the day-to-day lifestyles of aging adults, which gives researchers better insight into how the way we live affects the way we age. Director of the Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center at OHSU, Dr. Jeffery Kaye, has spent the past 30 years studying and understanding the way we age.
There is encouraging news for working moms. While it might be difficult, new research says it can protect memory and prevent Alzheimer’s disease. It’s not just for the money, either. Paid employment can have positive, long-term benefits for a woman’s brain. The new findings come from a federally-funded long-term study of aging people across the United States.
Even if you have a high genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s, new research has found that making healthy lifestyle choices can lower your overall risk for the disease, as well as your risk for other forms of dementia. Researchers from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that a healthy diet, regular exercise, light to moderate alcohol intake, not smoking and engaging in cognitively stimulating activities reduced the risk of Alzheimer's by 60 percent — when compared to those who only followed one or none of those habits.
For many people living with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, the demands of caring for a dog or pet can be a challenge. But a new robotic puppy being developed in California aims to change all of that by providing companionship and unconditional love for those who are unable to look after a real animal on their own. https://mobile.reuters.com/video/2019/07/03/meet-the-robot-puppy-that-co...
“I’m always in the present. I have to be one step ahead of David. Things go missing all the time in this house—the remote, mail and even the utensils. I’m down to a handful of forks! It would be simple if I could just lock the door to store some important items, but he doesn’t like that.”Mary (name changed for anonymity) is the primary caregiver for David, her husband of 50 years who is in the final stages of Alzheimer’s disease. For Mary, ‘being in the present’ refers to her constant worry about even the most mundane elements of life that many take for granted.
When Tatiana Lagos's father stopped driving, she didn't think much of it at first. "He'd say, 'Hey, can you pick me up?' " Lagos recalled of her father, who was in his early 60s and had recently retired from a career in international law. "And he was leaning heavily on his wife for the smallest things," such as scheduling a coffee date.
In the past, using the terms "Alzheimer’s disease" and "dementia" interchangeably was a generally accepted practice. Now there is rising appreciation that a variety of diseases and disease processes contribute to dementia. This week on Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine the host talks with Dr. Pete Nelson, of the department of pathology and laboratory medicine at UK. He recently co-chaired an international workgroup that characterized another form of dementia, known as LATE.
Japanese films about dementia are by now many and, given demographic trends here, interest in the subject is both natural and necessary. But as seen in "A Long Goodbye," Ryota Nakano’s drama about a family dealing with the dementia of its once-proud patriarch, dementia has also become a common device for having extracting audience tears.
It doesn’t take a huge stretch of the mind to understand why caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease is challenging — especially when that someone is a loved one. It can be physically taxing work, particularly in later stages of the disease when the person needs more and more help with daily functioning.

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