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PhysOrg.com 02/26/2020 10:00
Companies like to highlight when they do good things for society, such as making charitable donations, becoming more environmentally friendly or improving the diversity of their workforce. Broadly, these behaviors come under the umbrella of corporate social responsibility. Companies do them to increase customer loyalty and, ultimately, earn more revenue.
PhysOrg.com 02/25/2020 11:42
The main reason for the existence of social banks is to fund other social enterprises. On that basis, Simon Cornée from the University of Rennes 1, Panu Kalmi from the University of Vaasa and Ariane Szafarz from the Université Libre de Bruxelles propose that social banks can operate profitably and still lend to their borrowers at attractive interest rates when their owners and depositors accept lower returns on their investments.
PhysOrg.com 02/21/2020 11:37
Understanding the structure of proteins, the building blocks of life, is essential to obtain insight into their biological function. Due to their minute size and extreme fragility, these structures are enormously difficult to determine. Acquiring data of sufficient resolution requires immense doses of high energy X-ray radiation, which unfortunately irrevocably damages the proteins principally being investigated.
PhysOrg.com 02/21/2020 11:18
The interest expressed by the general public in social aspects is constantly growing and there are more and more companies and organisations that want to know what social contribution they make. The tool used to analyse this aspect is social accounting, "an information system that incorporates the social value that is generated in society," explained Leire San Jose, leader of the ECRI research group.
PhysOrg.com 02/20/2020 20:00
When we look for reliable sources of information, we turn to studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. But in some cases, researchers find it difficult to reproduce the results of certain studies, and often their findings turn out to be different from the original ones—even when the same methods and procedures are used—thereby making the study unreliable. This discrepancy is called a "reproducibility crisis"—or the inability of scientific findings to be replicated by other researchers. This problem has become more prevalent over the past few decades, and according to existing evidence, it affects up to a quarter of studies in cancer research and over a third of studies in psychology.

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