Millie
your market intelligence analyst
Search Results
Edit Save
4,374 results
Sophisticated phony videos called deepfakes have attracted plenty of attention as a possible threat to election integrity. But a bigger problem for the 2020 U.S. presidential contest may be “dumbfakes” — simpler and more easily unmasked bogus videos that are easy and often cheap to produce. Unlike deepfakes, which require sophisticated artificial intelligence, audio manipulation and facial mapping technology, dumbfakes can be made simply by varying the speed of video or selective editing. They are easier to create and can be convincing to an unsuspecting viewer, which makes them a much more immediate worry. A slowed-down video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that made her appear impaired garnered more than 2 million views on Facebook in May.
A year ago, Detroit and Silicon Valley had visions of putting thousands of self-driving taxis on the road in 2019, ushering in an age of driverless cars. Most of those cars have yet to arrive — and it is likely to be years before they do. Several carmakers and technology companies have concluded that making autonomous vehicles is going to be harder, slower and costlier than they thought. “We overestimated the arrival of autonomous vehicles,” Ford’s chief executive, Jim Hackett, said at the Detroit Economic Club in April. In the most recent sign of the scramble to regroup, Ford and Volkswagen said Friday that they were teaming up to tackle the self-driving challenge. The two automakers plan to use autonomous-vehicle technology from a Pittsbu.
When Karen Schirack, 67, slipped on her way into her house in January and broke her left femur in multiple places, she had a decision to make. Should she get surgery to repair the fractured thigh bone and replace her hip near Ajijic, Mexico, where she has lived for 20 years, or be airlifted back to her home state, Ohio, for surgery and rehabilitation? As the number of American retirees living overseas grows, more of them are confronting choices like Schirack’s about medical care. If they were living in the United States, Medicare would generally be their coverage option. But Medicare doesn’t pay for care outside the country, except in limited circumstances. Expatriate retirees might find private insurance policies and national health plans
WASHINGTON — President Trump said Thursday that he was looking "very seriously" at intervening in the hard-fought commercial battle for a $10 billion Pentagon cloud computing contract for which Amazon, a company he has frequently attacked, is seen as the leading contender. For the president to weigh in on the award of a major government contract would be highly unusual, raising questions of improper political influence, but the stakes are high and Amazon’s competitors have been lobbying aggressively.
Dozens of databases of people’s faces are being compiled without their knowledge by companies and researchers, with many of the images then being shared around the world, in what has become a vast ecosystem fueling the spread of facial recognition technology. The databases are pulled together with images from social networks, photo websites, dating services like OkCupid and cameras placed in restaurants and on college quads.
WASHINGTON — Chevron was nearly booted from Venezuela in 2007 during a nationalization drive led by the late socialist President Hugo Chavez. Twelve years later, it faces a similar threat from an unlikely corner: the White House. The Trump administration is facing a July 27 deadline to renew a license granting Chevron permission to continue operating in Venezuela despite U.S. sanctions aimed at ousting President Nicolas Maduro by choking off revenue from the world’s largest crude reserves. The San Ramon company has operated in the South American country for almost a century and its four joint ventures with state-run oil monopoly PDVSA currently produce about 200,000 barrels a day. That’s about a quarter of Venezuela’s total production in Ju.
LOS ANGELES — No one expected their culture would ever become mainstream when a few hundred comic book and science fiction enthusiasts and creators gathered in the basement of a San Diego hotel 49 years ago for what would become known as the first Comic-Con. Except Jack Kirby. "A long time ago he said, ‘One day Hollywood is going to come to Comic-Con to get its ideas,’" co-founder Mike Towry said.
Is a peek into the future worth your privacy in the present? That concern was in the spotlight this week with the resurgence of a smartphone app that uses artificial intelligence to transform your current face into your younger and older selves. People raised fears on Twitter and other social media sites that on iPhones, FaceApp would be able to see and upload all your photos, including screenshots with sensitive financial or health information or photos of kids with the names of their schools in the background. That’s not actually true, but it serves as a good reminder to think twice before downloading new apps. Even large, mainstream apps routinely collect user data. But many trendy-at-the-moment apps are guilty of mining user data as a p.
Elon Musk aspires to make inserting a computer connection into your brain as safe and painless as Lasik eye surgery. On Tuesday, Musk appeared at the California Academy of Sciences to announce that Neuralink, a company in which he has invested $100 million, had developed a "sewing-machine-like" robot that can implant ultrathin threads deep into the brain. The company claims the system will eventually be capable of reading and writing vast amounts of information.
Tech employers are famous for offering hires unlimited time vacations and endless free snacks, but such generous perks apparently aren't necessarily enough to establish a workplace as one of America's best, as a poll by job hunt site Indeed recently revealed. Benefits, the company found, is just one component as to what makes a company an attractive one for prospective workers, regardless of industry.
BEIJING — China’s economic growth sank to its lowest level in at least 26 years in the quarter ending in June, adding to pressure on Chinese leaders as they fight a tariff war with Washington. The world’s second-largest economy grew 6.2% over a year ago, down from the previous quarter’s 6.4%, government data showed this week. Hopes for an early growth rebound faded after President Trump raised tariffs on Chinese imports in May to turn up pressure on Beijing over the aggressive tactics it’s using to challenge American technological dominance.
Wells Fargo reported better-than-expected earnings despite lower interest income in the second quarter, a potential concern for investors with a Fed interest rate cut on the horizon. Shares in the San Francisco consumer banking giant slid nearly 3% on the day. Wells Fargo & Co., still under growth restrictions by regulators after years of missteps and scandals, reported net interest income for the quarter of $12.1 billion. That’s down 4% from $12.5 billion in the second quarter last year and a 2% decline from the first quarter of 2019. Analysts surveyed by FactSet were expecting $12.2 billion in net interest income for the bank. Net interest income carries extra importance for commercial banks like Wells Fargo, who rely less heavily on fee
PAOLI, Pa. — Gabriel Weinberg is taking aim at Google from a small building 20 miles west of Philadelphia that looks like a fake castle. An optometrist has an office downstairs. Weinberg’s company, DuckDuckGo, has become one of the feistiest adversaries of Google. Started over a decade ago, DuckDuckGo offers a privacy-focused alternative to Google’s search engine. The company’s share of the search engine market is still tiny — about 1% compared with Google’s 85%, according to StatCounter. But it has tripled over the past two years and is now handling about 40 million searches a day. It has also made a profit in each of the past five years, Weinberg said. Weinberg, 40, is among the most outspoken critics of the internet giants. DuckDuckGo’s
DEARBORN, Mich. — Contract talks between the United Auto Workers and Detroit’s three automakers kicked off with the union president departing from the traditionally friendly tone by telling Ford executives that workers want a bigger share of the companies’ record profits. While Ford executives talked often about working together at a ceremony Monday, UAW President Gary Jones emphasized that he wants to end concessions and the companies’ outsourcing of jobs to countries with lower-cost labor. "We will protect our work, our jobs and our way of life," Jones said.

Information Technologies

IT Markets

Business Issues

Companies - Public

Companies - Venture Funded

Analysts

Analyst Firms

Global Markets

Global Risk Factors

Government Agencies

Job Titles

Legal and Regulatory

Political Entities

Sources

Strategic Scenarios

Trends

Hints:

On this page, you see the results of the search you have run.  You may also view the following:

  •  Click on this drop-down menu on the right hand side of the page, to choose between the machine learning-produced Insights Reports, or the listing of concepts extracted from the results, in chart or list format. 


  •  View the number of search results returned for the search in each of your collections, and click on any of those numbers to view the entire listing of results from the chosen collection.

  •  Use the search adjustment drop-downs to change the scope, sorting, and presentation of your results.

  •  Show or hide the record’s caption (content description).

  •  Show actions that can be made with the search result record.

  •  Click on the Save button after running your search, to save it so that its results will be updated each time relevant new content is added to the designated collection. You may choose to be notified via search alerts.

Click here for more info on Search Results

Click here for more info on Machine Learning applications